Shop Project: Lift

Maff’s House of Wayward Mazdas got a huge upgrade this winter, and this one has been a LONG time coming.

I’ve been pricing and shopping and researching (and measuring my low, low ceiling) for over a year, and the right deal was there at the right time, so we pulled the trigger on a Dannmar M-6 mid-rise lift.

The plan is for a semi-permanent install of the “mobile” lift, ditching the cart for the pump and diverter valve, mounting those on the shop’s wall, keeping the wall-side post permanently installed, while keeping the option to move the off-side post sitting in the middle of the floor should the need for more space arise (like if I need to work on the trailer, as an example).

Delivery was…interesting. The freight company sent 1 guy to move the 900 lbs of lift with only a pallet jack that wasn’t actually tall enough to lift the thing. Fortunately, I have a bunch of lumber scraps so we were able to shim it, and after a mighty struggle, we got it down the lift gate, onto some furniture dollies and into the garage.

20181207_171631

Of course, these aren’t destined for the garage, but for the workshop. So I tore down the ‘pallet’ to get as many of the man-portable parts off and lighten the load, called a friend to help wrangle the thing, collected all my load binding gear and attached the winch to the Armada’s tow hitch.

20181207_182450

Carefully, ever so carefully, we backed it down the drive and into position.

20181207_185858

As you can see in the above picture, I’d spent some time measuring out the shop to position the posts, as they need to be plumb and square with each other. With the posts finally in the shop, I moved them into position to confirm that theory translated to the real world.

20181208_124438_HDR

And of course, the Miata won’t be the only vehicle using the lift, so I wanted to make sure it would fit the Dailies in our fleet.

20181209_094024

With everything in position, it was time to start mounting things permanently. I mounted a 2×10 to a pair of studs, then bolted the bracket for the pump and valve to it upside down, using the bolt holes for the diverter valve to mount it. I am mounting the diverter valve in the ceiling, so I didn’t need those holes and they made it convenient.

20181214_112450

Getting the pump mounted was a bit of a bear because it’s BLOODY heavy, but after phoning a friend, again, we got it mounted up.

20181215_112326

Next up were the hydraulic fittings on the posts. Those are a bit of a faff because you need to practically disassemble the post to get to the fittings at the bottom of the hydraulic cylinder. The way they’re designed, is to have 2 45 degree fittings, clocked so they’re “parallel” with each other and make an S-shape out the back of the post to clear the bolt hole back there when the hose, as designed, is installed. I am running the hoses up through the ceiling, so I don’t want that and realised, of course, that two 45s can pretty easily make a 90. Unfortunately there isn’t space at the bottom of the post for that 90 degree bend to pass through, so I had to assemble the 1st 45, put the cylinder in place in the post, then install the 2nd 45 in place down at the bottom of the post, where there really isn’t much room to work. The effort was worth it, however, as it worked a treat. Here you can see the “upgraded” quick disconnect fitting, as the ones the unit ships with are reported to be a little leaky. More a niusance than a real problem, but while I’m here installing it, $30 to fix the issue was well spent.

20181215_200941

I was morally certain that, with the state the shop’s structure was in when we bought the place, the floor was also certainly trash, and had planned & budgeted to cut the floor and pour new reinforced footers for the lift. With this thing holding a ton or more of weight over my head, this was not the sort of thing to take chances with.

My contractor buddy came by and we drilled a few test holes (using the posts’ bolt hole positions to do so, just in case), and found that not only was it thicker than the minimum spec required for the lift, it was in fact steel reinforced and with hard pack below it showing no signs of having settled (which would leave the concrete unsupported). A very pleasant surprise that saved a ton of time, effort and budget.

We drilled the holes and opted to epoxy the wedge anchors in (along with expanding them properly) for the full belt-and-suspenders to make sure they were secure.

20181217_124309_HDR

With the posts finally mounted in place, I could start working on the hydraulic connections. Doing my research I found many people who extended 1 or both hoses to the posts to remote mount the pump similar to what I’m doing. That seems problematic for 2 reasons: If you only extend 1 hose, you can end up with the lift not raising evenly, and if you extend both hoses, well…it’s bloody expensive. Some measuring showed that the hoses from the valve to the leg were plenty long enough if I remote mounted the diverter valve in the ceiling, then I would only have to have 1 hose made to go from the pump to the valve, and route the hoses to the posts down from above.

The challenge, however, is that many have reported issues bleeding air from the system when running hoses that high above the pump, so I opted to do that before mounting everything in the ceiling. This made mounting slightly more challenging, as I was going to be dealing with full hydraulic hoses, but it was worth the effort. As I was bolting the fairly heavy valve to a ceiling joist, I also made a load-spreader plate with the bolt hole pattern from the valve to put on the opposite side so that I’m not risking pulling the bolts through and damaging the joist further.

I’ll admit, the first test load didn’t put a lot of strain on the system…

20181217_174110

With the system bled and the hoses and valves mounted and routed up in the rafters, it was time for a real test. The lift is rated to 6000 lbs. I have a vehicle that weighs just under that figure. Let’s see if all the work we did holds!

20181220_194031

With the Nissan being as tall as it is, there wasn’t much head room, but it does look like I could do some minor suspension or brake work on the lift should the need arise. It’s not very high, but the lifting arms are nearly fully extended to reach the frame rails, so there was quite a torque arm on the mounts here. Given that nothing budged, I think it’s safe to say we can put this unit into service!

Job the first was to quiet a noisy power steering pump on the Subaru. There’s an O-ring prone to failure that lets air in when cold, and you need the wheels off the ground to bleed the power steering hydraulics, so why not give ‘er a go? I couldn’t get full height w/ the Subaru (I’ll likely be moving that garage door opener off to one side), but it got it plenty high to be useful for under-car work:

20181221_083036_HDR

And now with Papa Bear and Momma Bear having tried out the new digs, it was Baby Bear’s turn. And for that, this lift was JUUUST right. Turns out, I can actually use a measuring tape correctly from time to time!

The first full draft pull on the lift (with a load), and no clearance problems anywhere.

20181221_164357

Ok maybe 1 clearance problem…. I’ll need to make myself a new rolling chair, methinks, but I was pretty certain of that going into this.

20181221_164303
20181221_164418

The next fun job is going to be marking out spots for the setup stands and then re-leveling those to each other, as the old spots won’t work with the lift’s position. The offside post is actually directly on where 1 of the pads went in the previous iteration. And next spring, likely, I’ll get my hands on a pressure washer and blast the old markings off of the floor. But until then, I’m going to enjoy using my new toy…er…tool!

Shop Project: LED lights

There hasn’t been a whole lot going on with the car of late, but the off-season upgrades are in full swing. I’ve had a bunch of 4′ LED light fixtures to replace the fluorescent fixtures in the shop for almost a year now, but finally had the time to install them this weekend. 

I replaced 6 x 3-tube, 4′ T8 and 2 x 2-tube 4′ T12 fixtures with 10 x 4500 lumen Honeywell Linkable LED fixtures, adding 2 fixtures over the machine tools at the back of the shop where there really was never enough light

I was not expecting there to be much of a difference in pictures, but boy is the before and after striking. 

Fluorescents:

20181204_212510

LEDs:

20181209_220831_HDR
20181209_170321_HDR

It’s so much less dreary, and the light output is much, much ‘cleaner’. No flicker, no more buzzing ballasts, no more needing 5 minutes for the lights to warm up when it’s cold in the shop, no more each bulb a slightly different shade of yellow / pink / white / brown.

Oh, yeah… there’s a “little” not-so-sneak-peek there to the much bigger shop upgrade happening this month.