20′ Enclosed Race Trailer – Part 4 – Storage

The main idea is the keep things off of the floor, because, well…gravity doesn’t make a good load binder.
In addition to a boatload of E Track, I will put a small cabinet / bench to put on a wall, a spot for my tool box, a fuel jug carrier, and a tire rack with a way to tie the tires down.

I built the tire rack using 4 E Track 2×4 pockets, a couple 2x4s, and some bracing between the 2. It’ll take 4 race tires and 2 trailer spares. I’m using single-slot E Track anchors to secure the tires. The fuel jug rack is also there in front of the kart:

20190502_130547_HDR

I also put up, just, a BUNCH of E Track. Along both sides (at a useful height this time, if you compare to to earlier photos, it was barely higher than the inner fenders).

20190502_130521
20190502_130539_HDR

I also put some at the very front of the trailer to serve as a bumper for the kart, to keep it from rubbing against the wall, but also to serve as storage when the Kart isn’t there:

20190501_200356

And then loaded everything up 1 more time as a final test to make sure I have room for everything where I think it ought to go, and as a systems test of the winch and pulley block, as I hadn’t actually pulled anything up with it yet.

Plenty clearance for the toolbox on the driver’s side:

20190502_131135_HDR

And space on the passenger side as well. That fender’s a nice place to hang that folding table:

20190502_131142_HDR

Canopy and generator added at the rear, with plenty of room for other sundries:

20190502_133510_HDR

A handy dandy E Track fire extinguisher mount, and a couple of E Track D-ring straps make a great way to store folding chairs:

20190502_133158_HDR

Even with the car, kart, toolbox and cooler loaded up, there’s plenty of room for more stuff should the need arise.

20190502_133542_HDR

And finally, the all important bottle opener by the door. Can’t go without that.

20190502_133647_HDR

Looks like we’re ready to go for her maiden voyage this weekend 😀

Control Arms & Avons (again)

It’s been a long break, but after getting absolutely every possible run out a set of Hoosiers, I wanted to try another readily available set of tires. Around the same time, Paco Motorsports’ trick adjustable Rear Upper control arms went on sale with some factory seconds (ie: cosmetic blemishes).

I’ve coveted them for a while because the stock rear adjusters tie toe to camber, and these allow you to do 2 really interesting things:

  1. Adjust toe and camber individually.
  2. Play with suspension geometry a little bit. Because the upper rear arm is nearly infinitely adjustable, you can use the stock alignment cams to set toe, but also set track width, and then compensate by making the upper arm longer or shorter to maintain your alignment.
  3. Easy, consistent adjustments. Each 180° turn on the control arm translates to a 1/4° change in camber.

It’s one of those things that gives you plenty of rope to hang yourself with, but if you take your time and plan out what you’re doing (and take lots of measurements), you can do a lot of good as well. Which means I’m probably going to end up metaphorically hanging from the end of that rope…

20160910_140222

 

There were some concerns about the strength of the threaded components, so I took a few measurements. The gist of it is: the shaft is 3/4″ diameter, and it is a fully threaded sleeve on the control arm portion so there’s thread engagement far beyond the front and rear “nuts” it looks like it has. Barring some weird metallurgy issue, these should be plenty strong.

20160910_152031

 

Finally installed with the car. Between the adjustable upper arm, the adjustable offset upper-outer bushing (in the knuckle) and the stock cam adjusters, there’s a lot of adjustment now built into the suspension to make (or break) the setup.

20160910_174117

 

On to the tires: There is a readily available Formula Atlantic (I think?) Avon A11 compound Radial Slick in a 240/600R15 size. It’s about 1/2″ taller and wider than the Hoosiers I’ve been running. I’m not thrilled about the taller bit, as it may end up with some interference with the chassis, but the wider should be nice. And they allegedly last longer than the Hoosiers, while being as easy to get.

Ideally, I’d be on a 275/35/15 Hoosier A7 or a 21.5 x 10.7 x 15 Avon, but those are friggin expensive, and unobtanium on the used market, so I’m going to see how these do, then end up settling on either these, or the 23 x 9.5 x 15 Hoosiers after this set.

And finally, last night I had a buddy come by to help drink my beer and measure while I adjusted from under the car. While the last set of tires wore fairly evenly, it was apparent that the rears needed a little bit more camber, and the fronts needed to be adjusted. I think they got knocked out of alignment over a couple big bump at an event, because we found about -1.5° degrees camber on the left side and -3.5° on the right. Definitely not ideal.

After roughing in the rears to be even, I threw the “Me Simulator” 210 lbs of steel plates into the driver’s seat and we got to work. The alignment numbers I ended up on are:

Front Camber: -2.75°
Front Toe: 5mm out
Front Caster: as much as I can get away with and hit my camber number…

Rear camber: -1.75°
Rear toe: 0″

We’ve got an event this weekend so we’ll see how she runs, and go from there.